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  Stories in the popular press on research in the Chang lab:
 
 
 
  • Molecular biology: A second layer of information in RNA
  Three studies have characterized the full complement of RNA folding in cells.
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  • Scientists create technique for high-speed, low-cost epigenomic mapping. Inside Stanford Medicine
  A new technique developed by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine could pave the way to an era of personalized epigenomics
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  • ‘Dead’ gene comes to life, puts chill on inflammation, researchers find. Inside Stanford Medicine
  A gene long presumed dead comes to life under the full moon of inflammation,Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found.
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  • Science, December,2010. Insights of the Decade
  #1. The Dark Genome
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  • Stanford Medicine Magazine: Fall 2010 Contents
  Reading between the genes
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  • Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal: Friday, September 17, 2010
  Stanford creates biology app to encourage communication between researchers
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  • HHMI News: September 2, 2010
  RNA Structure By Rapid Fire
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  • Stanford School and Medicine News: Sep. 1, 2010
  Now coming to your iPhone
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  • Business Wire: March 26, 2009
  Dr. Howard Chang selected as HHMI Early Career Scientist
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The 2009 HHMI Early Career Scientists.
 
 
 
  • The Vilcek Foundation: February 9, 2009
  Dr. Howard Chang wins Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise

About the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise Recipient
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  • Washington Post: January 8, 2009
  Researchers Gain Insights Into Aging in Mice

Stanford University researchers have linked two previously thought-to-be-separate pathways tied to aging, at least in mice, leading to more thought that physically getting older is an orderly and deliberate genetic occurrence.
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  • Forbes: April 8, 2008
  Cancer Stem Cells Created in Lab

Researchers at Stanford University have succeeded in transforming skin cells into what appear to be cancer stem cells, in a feat that could propel cancer research forward.
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  • Reversal of skin aging by gene blockade: November 30, 2007
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Stanford News Release
 
 
 
  • Stanford Report: July 11, 2007
  RNA, no mere messenger, calls some shots in gene activity, researchers find
BY KRISTA CONGER

Large, seemingly useless pieces of RNA, a molecule originally considered only a lowly messenger for DNA, play an important role in letting cells know where they are in the body and what they are supposed to become, researchers at the School of Medicine have discovered.
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  • Stanford Medical Center Report: May 23, 2007
  'Star Trek'-type scans may reveal tumor genetics
By MITZI BAKER

Peering into the body and visualizing its molecular secrets, once the stuff of science fiction, is one step closer to reality with a study from researchers at the School of Medicine and the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine.
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  • New York Times: August 15, 2006
  How Human Cells Get Their Marching Orders
By NICHOLAS WADE

The human body may seem to change little over the years, but beneath this deceptive calm, cells are in constant flux as old ones are discarded and new ones appear. How do the new recruits know where they are meant to go?
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  • Talk of the Nation Science Friday (NPR): January 16, 2004
  Interview: Howard Chang discusses new cancer research and how some cancers are genetically similar to the way our bodies heal
By IRA FLATOW

But first, it's back to the future. Two decades ago, a Harvard pathologist described cancer as a wound that does not heal. Now scientists have been able to use the tools of modern molecular biology ...
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